Tag Archives: daca

DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) posts in the CitizenPath immigration blog.

How to Prepare for a DACA Renewal Application

DACA Renewal Application is ReadyThe initial application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was an exhaustive and challenging process for many. But you should be pleasantly surprised to know that the DACA renewal application is significantly less complicated.

In fact, many DACA applicants are now able to prepare the DACA renewal application by themselves.

Eligibility for DACA Renewal

An individual may be considered for renewal of DACA if he or she met the guidelines for consideration of initial DACA and meets all the following guidelines:

  • Did not depart the United States on or after August 15, 2012 without advance parole;
  • Has continuously resided in the United States since he or she submitted his or her most recent request for DACA that was approved up to the present time; and
  • Has not been convicted of a felony, a significant misdemeanor, or three or more misdemeanors, and does not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

Which Forms to File for a DACA Renewal Application

You will use the identical forms for a DACA renewal application as you did for the initial application. There are three mandatory forms for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals renewals that must be prepared and filed with USCIS. You can download all three from the USCIS website:

As a candidate for DACA renewal, you should take extra care when reviewing your application to ensure that the answers and information are consistent with everything you submitted in your previously approved Form I-821D and I-765. However, you do not need to re-submit documents you already submitted with your previous DACA requests.

If a lawyer helped you prepare the original DACA packet, contact the lawyer’s office. They should be willing to give you a copy. In this way, you can ensure that you provide consistent answers. You could easily raise red flags by providing different answers, such as a slightly different initial date of entry.

CitizenPath Makes Preparing the DACA Renewal Application Easy
Created by immigration attorneys, our web-based service helps you prepare the DACA application (all three forms) by yourself. It helps eliminate common mistakes and provides alerts if your answer is a problem. We even guarantee that USCIS will accept your application. Try it for free.

What to Send with the DACA Renewal Application

prepare daca renewal application early

The DACA renewal application is significantly easier to prepare that the initial application. Documents to prove entry, residence and education are not required again.

There is a similar renewal fee. Although there is no cost to file Form I-821D, there is a $410 fee for I-765 and an $85 biometrics fee for fingerprints.

Supporting documents can vary based on your specific situation. However, DACA renewal applicants will generally need to submit:

  • $495 via check, money order, or credit card
  • A photocopy of your last Employment Authorization Card (front and back).

Depending on your specific answers on the forms, certain individuals may have to submit additional supporting documents.

When You Can Renew DACA

CitizenPath recommends that our clients prepare and file the DACA renewal application five months before the expiration date. USCIS may reject applications submitted sooner than five months. However, due to the long processing time, submit your application package (all three forms) no less than four months before the expiration date.

It will take approximately 5-6 months for USCIS to process your DACA renewal application and mail a new card. Prepare early. If your current period of DACA expires before you receive a renewal, you may accrue unlawful presence for any time between the periods of deferred action (unless you were under 18 years old when submitting request), and you will not be authorized to work in the United States (regardless of your age at the time of filing).

About CitizenPath

CitizenPath provides simple, affordable, step-by-step guidance through USCIS immigration applications. Individuals, attorneys and non-profits use the service on desktop or mobile device to prepare immigration forms accurately, avoiding costly delays. CitizenPath allows users to try the service for free and provides a 100% money-back guarantee that USCIS will accept the application or petition. We provide support for the Application for a Work Permit (Form I-765), DACA Renewal (Form I-821D), and several other USCIS immigration forms.

Source: USCIS

USCIS Resumes Accepting DACA Applications

For the second time, a federal judge has issued an injunction that orders the Trump administration to continue accepting applications for the DACA program. The New York ruling affirms an earlier court injunction in California that saved the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program from certain death. USCIS is now accepting DACA renewal applications.

On September 5, 2017, attorney general Jeff Sessions announced that the Trump administration would phase out DACA. At the time of the announcement, eligible applicants could file a DACA application only until October 5, 2017.

Under the federal court ruling, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will now run the DACA program as it was before the September 5 announcement. However, USCIS says that they will not be accepting applications for initial grants of DACA, only renewal applications. Continue reading

How to Replace a Lost DACA Card

Replace a Lost DACA CardIt’s probably the first U.S.-government issued identification that you’ve ever had. So losing a work permit from your Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) grant can be an exasperating experience. Don’t despair; you can replace a lost DACA card.

It’s important to understand that losing the DACA card, officially known as an employment authorization card, does not mean that you’ve lost your grant of DACA. It’s only a card that proves your deferred action status and authorization to work in the United States.

However, not having the work permit in your possession can create at least two serious problems: Continue reading

U.S. Taxes and Immigration Consequences

U.S. Taxes and Immigration ConsequencesFor immigrants arriving to the United States, the American tax system can be a very new and confusing concept. In fact, the tax system in the U.S. is so complex that most natural-born Americans have difficulty filing each year.

In the U.S., everyone with income above certain levels is expected to file a tax return. That’s not true in all countries around the world. In many countries, the government withholds taxes from paychecks, and the individual never has to directly file an income tax return. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is the U.S. agency responsible for collecting taxes.

Whether you are a lawful permanent resident or an undocumented immigrant, it’s important that you get a basic understanding of your tax obligations and the consequences of where you pay taxes. Continue reading

USCIS Fee Increases Effective December 23rd

uscis fee increasesEffective December 23, 2016, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will increase the fees that must be submitted with the majority of its immigration forms. The USCIS fee increases, which were finalized in an announcement yesterday, can be found in a final rule published in the Federal Register. Applications and petitions postmarked or filed on or after December 23, 2016, must include these new fees or USCIS will reject your submission.

During the early summer of 2016, USCIS announced fee increases would be coming. The USCIS fee increases became official yesterday. Fees increased by a weighted average of 21 percent for many forms. While fees for some forms increased only modestly, fees for other forms such as Form N-600 ballooned by 95 percent. Continue reading

4 Paths to Legal Status for Undocumented Immigrants

4 Paths to Legal Status for Undocumented ImmigrantsSeveral million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. received a stunning blow last week when the Supreme Court’s deadlocked decision effectively killed President Obama’s new deferred action plans. The immigration actions known as Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Permanent Residents (DAPA) and an expanded version of the already successful Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) appear to be hopelessly frozen.

For undocumented immigrants, the clear goal is a path to a long-term legal status. These paths to legal status lead to permanent resident status (green card) and U.S. citizenship. Certain immigrants with no legal status may have some paths available. This article covers those options and who could qualify for them. Continue reading

Still DREAM’n on DACA’s 4th Anniversary

Still Dream'n on DACA AnniversaryTomorrow marks the fourth anniversary of President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive order. And while the program has positively transformed the lives of many, there is still so much left unaccomplished in those four years. The DREAM has yet to be fully realized.

The DACA program, announced by President Obama on June 15, 2012, provides benefits to young immigrants living in the United States who came to the U.S. at an early age as undocumented immigrants with their parents. Each renewable two-year grant of DACA provides:

  • Deferred action — Protection from deportation
  • Employment authorization – a work permit that allows the individual to work within the United States

Continue reading

Fight for Families Enters Supreme Showdown

The battle to unfreeze President Obama’s DAPA and expanded DACA executive actions is now in the U.S. Supreme Court

fight for families dapa immigrationYesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments over the lawsuit that froze the implementation of an expansion to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and the creation of the new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program. For immigration advocates, this is a major decision in the fight for families.
Continue reading

How Scalia’s Death Affects DAPA and DACA

scalia death dapa and dacaU.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s recent death and how a new Justice will be selected has injected new fuel into the Democratic and Republican debates. But it’s highly unlikely that a new Justice will be selected before this spring when the Supreme Court takes on expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Permanent Residents (DAPA). Both the DAPA and expanded DACA programs have been blocked by lower courts. In the case known as United States v. Texas, the Supreme Court is expected to make a final decision. Continue reading

File Taxes with DACA Status

file taxes with daca
After obtaining Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), recipients will generally have to file taxes with DACA. Like everyone else, your income tax return is due April 15th.

If future laws provide a path to citizenship for deferred action recipients, you can bet that your responsibility as a tax paying member of society will be scrutinized. Filing taxes after DACA is a great way to build a solid track record too. Down the road, there’s a good chance you’ll need to show compliance with tax requirements, proof of your income, or prove your physical presence in the United States. Continue reading