Tag Archives: work permit

Work permit posts in the CitizenPath immigration blog.

U.S. Work Visa Types for Foreign Nationals

US Work Visa Type for Foreign WorkersThe United States has long been a destination for economic opportunity. Immigrants have a significant history in American business as contributors and creators. They have labored in fields and factories, and immigrants have also built some of the largest U.S. businesses. There are many types of U.S. work visas and other statuses that may provide employment privileges in the United States. The rules for each can vary.

This is not a comprehensive list of all possibilities, but we’ve compiled a list of some of the more popular U.S. work visa types. Continue reading

3 Things You Need To Know About Taxes Before Moving To The U.S.

tax resident status in united statesWhether you are a temporary nonresident alien in the United States or you’re planning to move to the U.S. permanently, there are actions you can take to get your tax affairs in order. It’s important to know your tax resident status and what specific tax obligations some with your situation.

Planning your finances before you become liable for U.S. taxes or find the U.S. trying to tax your worldwide income can save you a significant amount of money. Continue reading

U.S. Taxes and Immigration Consequences

U.S. Taxes and Immigration ConsequencesFor immigrants arriving to the United States, the American tax system can be a very new and confusing concept. In fact, the U.S. tax system is so complex that most natural-born Americans have difficulty filing each year. As a general rule, U.S. tax law applies to you if you live in the United States or spend a significant amount of time here.

In the United States everyone with income above certain levels is expected to file a tax return. That’s not true in all countries around the world. In many countries, the government withholds taxes from paychecks, and the individual never has to directly file an income tax return. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is the U.S. agency responsible for collecting taxes.

Whether you are a lawful permanent resident or an undocumented immigrant, it’s important that you get a basic understanding of your tax filing obligations. Continue reading

How to Apply for a U.S. Work Permit

How to Apply for U.S. Work PermitMany people want to come to the United States to work, but not everyone can. Foreign nationals must have employment authorization before accepting work in the United States. In fact, both employees and employers may be subject to fines or imprisonment for illegal employment arrangements.

To work in the United States, a foreign national must have one of the following:

  • A Permanent Resident Card (also known as a Green Card)
  • An Employment Authorization Document (U.S. work permit) or
  • An employment-related visa which allows you to work for a particular employer.

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How to Replace a Lost DACA Card

Replace a Lost DACA CardIt’s probably the first U.S.-government issued identification that you’ve ever had. So losing a work permit from your Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) grant can be an exasperating experience. Don’t despair; you can replace a lost DACA card.

It’s important to understand that losing the DACA card, officially known as an employment authorization card, does not mean that you’ve lost your grant of DACA. It’s only a card that proves your deferred action status and authorization to work in the United States.

However, not having the work permit in your possession can create at least two serious problems: Continue reading

Fight for Families Enters Supreme Showdown

The battle to unfreeze President Obama’s DAPA and expanded DACA executive actions is now in the U.S. Supreme Court

fight for families dapa immigrationYesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments over the lawsuit that froze the implementation of an expansion to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and the creation of the new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program. For immigration advocates, this is a major decision in the fight for families.
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3 Surprising Facts about F-1 Student Employment

f-1 studentThere are many rules and restrictions related to F-1 student employment in the United States. Non-immigrant visas are issued for specific, temporary reasons to visit the U.S.

When issuing a non-immigrant visa, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) takes measures to validate that the applicant intends to return home. Therefore, there are additional checks to make sure employment is related to your education.

When evaluating their employment options, many international students are surprised to learn about these 3 lesser known F-1 student employment facts: Continue reading

Deferred Action Raises Wages

deferred action raises wages hispanic caucusThe court injunction that has halted the implementation of Obama’s executive action on immigration may also be freezing economic growth for the United States. Research from the Center for American Progress (CAP) suggests there are economic gains of granting deferred action to undocumented immigrants through programs like DACA and DAPA. Deferred action raises wages and generates increased tax revenues.

While 26 states battle it out with the Obama administration, another story is unfolding. The United States has already benefited from programs like Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Continue reading

H-4 Employment Authorization Now Available

h-4 employment authorization for engineersCertain H-4 dependent spouses of H-1B visa holders may now apply for an Employment Authorization Document. The final rule giving H-4 employment authorization was part of the executive actions on immigration that President Obama announced in November 2014. It became effective on May 26, 2015. The new rule ends years of waiting by thousands of H-4 visa holders that have been unable to work in the United States.

An H-4 visa is issued to the immediate family members (spouse and children under 21 years of age) of H visa holders (H-1A, H-1B, H-2A, H-2B, or H-3), so that they can legally stay in the U.S. However these dependent spouses have not had the privilege of H-4 employment authorization in the United States. Continue reading