Category Archives: Nonimmigrant Visa

Immigration Insider articles in this category include information about obtaining and maintaining U.S. nonimmigrant visas. Nonimmigrant visas include temporary visas such as visitors (B1/B2), employment (H1-B), and student (F-1).

Adjustment of Status for Visa Waiver Program Entrants

Adjustment of Status for Visa Waiver Program EntrantsAs a general rule, foreign nationals who enter the United States through the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) may not adjust status to permanent resident (green card holder). Specifically, a foreign national admitted as a nonimmigrant without a visa under a Visa Waiver Program is barred from adjustment of status. But there is an exception for immediate relatives and VAWA-based applicants. Adjustment of status for Visa Waiver Program entrants is possible for immediate relatives of U.S. citizens. These bars also do not apply to those applying under the federal Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Immediate relatives have tremendous privileges and allowances under U.S. immigration law. As such, adjustment of status for visa waiver program entrants is special benefit available to immediate relatives. Continue reading

Form I-485 Denial from Bars to Adjustment

Form I-485 DenialImmigration law (INA §245) allows certain foreign nationals who are physically present in the United States to adjust status to permanent resident (green card holder). A foreign national may not be eligible to file Form I-485, Application to Adjust Status, if one or more bars to adjustment applies. Bars to adjustment of status are rules that exclude certain individuals that have committed a particular act or violation. They are factors that can disqualify an applicant. Many applicants get a Form I-485 denial as a result of bars they didn’t realize existed.

Some of the most common statutory bars to adjustment that result in I-485 denials include:

  • Unlawful status
  • Failure to maintain status
  • Unauthorized employment

Continue reading

Dual Intent Visas

dual intent visas for nonimmigrantsA dual intent visa allows foreign nationals to be temporarily present in the United States with the known intention of possibly immigrating to the U.S. permanently. That’s significant because most temporary visas require that the visitor intend to return home. Thus, attempting to adjust status to permanent resident with other nonimmigrant visas can potentially trigger severe, long-term immigration problems.

Most people will find it difficult to qualify for a U.S. nonimmigrant visa, such as a visitor visa, if there is any evidence of immigrant intent—a past intent, an intent to seek to immigrate during this trip to the U.S., an intent to immigrate to the U.S. in the future, or even a hope to immigrate in the future. The applicant must establish nonimmigrant intent. Continue reading

Obtaining a U.S. Visitor Visa with a Pending I-130 Petition

Get a visitor visa with a pending I-130 petitionThe process to obtain a family-based green card can be a long road. While some eligible relationships may only take a few months, other can take years. Naturally, it would be nice to visit family in the United States while waiting for the immigrant visa. Unfortunately, it can be difficult to obtain a B-1 or B-2 visitor visa after filing Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative.

It may be difficult, but it’s not impossible to obtain a visitor visa with a pending I-130 petition. Many people with pending immigrant visa petitions have successfully traveled to the United States on a B visitor visa or through the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). In fact, Canadians can typically cross the border with ease with a visa or visa waiver. For others, it will be necessary to prove the trip will only be temporary. Continue reading

The New 90-Day Rule and Adjusting Status

How the new 90-day rule (and elimination of the 30/60 day rule) may affect your adjustment of status to permanent resident

90-Day Rule When Adjusting StatusIn September 2017, the U.S. Department of State made a significant change to its Foreign Affairs Manual (FAM). This had a dramatic effect on the way immigration officers evaluate inadmissibility in certain cases. And it may affect future applications for adjustment of status. The change essentially eliminated the 30/60 day rule and established a stricter standard now known as the 90-day rule.

Any nonimmigrant visa holder should be aware of this amendment because it may affect how immigration officials perceive attempts to change status. Although U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has not declared an intent to use the 90-day rule also, they previously used the 30/60 day rule as a guideline. Therefore, nonimmigrant visa holders attempting to obtain a green card through adjustment of status should be aware of the 90-day rule. Continue reading

30/60 Day Rule: Adjusting Status Too Early

UPDATE: The U.S. Department of State has eliminated the 30/60 day rule in favor of a 90-day rule. For more information, read The New 90-Day Rule and Adjusting Status.

 
Nonimmigrant Visa and 30/60 day ruleU.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) uses a “30/60 day rule” to evaluate a person’s nonimmigrant intent when certain events occur.

For the purposes of an adjustment of status application that’s filed soon after a person enters the United States, USCIS may apply the 30/60 day rule to help determine if the applicant violated the terms of a nonimmigrant visa.

Therefore, if you enter the U.S. in certain nonimmigrant (temporary) visa categories with the blatant intention of applying for permanent residence (green card), USCIS could potentially your deny application.

Meeting the requirements to adjust status isn’t enough. Before you attempt to file an adjustment of status application, be aware of how USCIS will evaluate your intentions. Continue reading

Fiancé Visa Interview Questions: What K-1 Visa Applicants Can Expect

K1 Fiance Visa Interview QuestionsAn interview is an essential part of obtaining virtually any nonimmigrant visa for entry to the United States. But K-1 fiancé visa interview questions dive deeper into your history and intentions. They can even seem a little personal. And that’s a little scary.

It’s natural to be anxious about your K-1 interview. If you are prepared and know your fiancé well, you’ll find that the fiancé visa interview questions are actually very simple to answer. The K-1 questions will focus on your relationship with the U.S. citizen fiancé, but there’s no reason to fear the interview if you have a genuine relationship. Continue reading

USCIS Fee Increases Effective December 23rd

uscis fee increasesEffective December 23, 2016, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will increase the fees that must be submitted with the majority of its immigration forms. The USCIS fee increases, which were finalized in an announcement yesterday, can be found in a final rule published in the Federal Register. Applications and petitions postmarked or filed on or after December 23, 2016, must include these new fees or USCIS will reject your submission.

During the early summer of 2016, USCIS announced fee increases would be coming. The USCIS fee increases became official yesterday. Fees increased by a weighted average of 21 percent for many forms. While fees for some forms increased only modestly, fees for other forms such as Form N-600 ballooned by 95 percent. Continue reading

3 Surprising Facts about F-1 Student Employment

f-1 studentThere are many rules and restrictions related to F-1 student employment in the United States. Non-immigrant visas are issued for specific, temporary reasons to visit the U.S.

When issuing a non-immigrant visa, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) takes measures to validate that the applicant intends to return home. Therefore, there are additional checks to make sure employment is related to your education.

When evaluating their employment options, many international students are surprised to learn about these 3 lesser known F-1 student employment facts: Continue reading